Comic News

Comic News

  • July 6, 2020

    The Edge of the Woods at Monts-Girard, Fontainebleau Forest, Théodor Rousseau, oil on wood, roughly 32 x 48 inches, (80 x 122 cm), in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, which has zoomable and downloadable versions of the high-res image. Rousseau was one Read More ... […]

  • July 2, 2020

    Thundersong's Healer of the Woods.. . My version inspired by the original design... Congrats again on the win. […]

  • July 2, 2020

    The newest arrival from Dan Zimmer's Illustrated Press is a major book about illustrator Mead Schaeffer.   To write the book, I interviewed Schaeffer's daughter in her home in Vermont and was given exclusive access to Schaeffer's personal scrapbooks.  Schaeffer was unusual in that he had three different incarnations as an illustrator.  From the introduction: The first time Mead Schaeffer became nationally famous, it was as an illustrator of adventure stories such as The Count of Monte Cristo, The Three Musketeers, Les Miserables and Moby Dick.  Schaeffer was “one of the foremost illustrators of the romantic era of American fiction” according to illustration historian Fred Taraba. Critic Arpi Ermoyan, in her book Famous American illustrators lauded Schaeffer’s “romantic, swashbuckling and theatrical” paintings which earned him a spot in the illustrators’ Hall of Fame. Schaeffer worked for decades painting evocative mood illustrations for some of the top fiction books and magazines of his day. The second time Schaeffer became famous it was for a tighter, more realistic style of painting for a very different kind of subject. The harsh realities of World War II changed popular taste from the escapism of costume adventure stories to sober realism about modern day threats. Schaeffer played a significant role during the war years with a series of popular and highly regarded covers for The Saturday Evening Post, painted as tributes to branches of the US armed services. Unlike Schaeffer’s earlier work, these new paintings were precise and accurate down to the last detail, from the buttons on the uniforms to the configuration of the stars overhead.  After the war, Schaeffer became famous a third time. He traveled around the country as a reportorial cover artist for the Post, chronicling American domestic life. Cities, towns and businesses competed for Schaeffer’s attention, eager to win a prized spot on a cover of the Post. By showing the patchwork quilt of America in the 1940s and ‘50s, Schaeffer helped to educate the country. Readers learned about the varied scenes and lifestyles in far corners of America, some of which had previously escaped national attention. In this role, Schaeffer presaged the popular illustrator-as-journalist movement of the 1960s. By the time Schaeffer retired to a satisfying life as a fisherman, he had become successful and well known for each of these three roles. The book is now shipping.  For those who think they might be interested, you can find a preview on the Illustrated Press web site. […]

  • July 1, 2020

    In this week's episode of Nerdmudgeon, me and my buddies talk about "Thor: Dark World"! Please drop by and give us a listen if you get the chance, and if you're so inclined, pass the word around to YOUR nerd … Continue reading &rarr […]

  • June 29, 2020

    For the next few weeks we will be building a team of RPG characters based on the following classes: Warrior/Fighter, Knight/Paladin, Barbarian/Berserker, Monk/Martial Artist, Archer/Ranger, Thief/Rogue/Assassin, Priest/Healer, Mage/Wizard, and finally Summoner/Necromancer/Druid.  Your CDC challenge this week is to create an … Continue reading &rarr […]

  • June 29, 2020

    Great work this week folks. Very tough to choose a winner. Runner up this week goes to Meniukas. This entry is both shocking and beautiful. Well done. And the  win this week goes to...... Thundersong This is so lovely and … Continue reading &rarr […]

 

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